Book Review: Tell the Wind and Fire by Sarah Rees Brennan

tell wind fire

Favourite quotes

“Real grief is ugly and uncomfortable. People look away from grief the same way they look away from severed limbs or gaping wounds. What they want is pain like death on a stage: beautiful, bloodless, presented for their entertainment”.

“Happiness is self-sabotage, a mean trick that your own mind plays on you. It makes you careless, makes you lose your grip, and once you lose your grip, you lose everything. You certainly aren’t happy anymore”.

“People will come up with a hundred thosand reasons why other people do not count as human, but that does not mean anyone has to listen”.

 

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

In the future, there are two New Yorks – the self-indulgent Light City ruled by powerful and ruthless Council of Light magicians, and the Dark city where dark magicians deemed too dangerous to live with the rest of the people are buried. Both races need each other to stay alive. Lucie Manette was born in the Dark city, but she managed to win herself a place in the Light city, amongst the elite, through careful manipulations and lies and becoming a symbol of the Light magicians’ mercy. The status has also helped her win the heart of Ethan Stryker – son and nephew of Charles and Mark Stryker, prominent figures on the Light Council. All is well, until Lucie uncovers a fatal secret about Ethan that involves a forbidden Dark ritual and a despised Doppleganger named Carwyn. Once Carwyn’s existence comes to light, the future of the Stryker family hangs by a Golden thread that’s becoming thinner and thinner as Carwyn’s revolutionary activities come to “Light”. The two cities are facing the threat of burning, and it is up to Lucie to save Ethan, Carwyn and bring about the end of the revolution.

 

The author of “The Lynburn Legacy” has created a retelling of Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities”. Needless to say that the adventures of Lucie, Ethan and Carwyn are very different from those of Kami, Jared and the rest of the Lynburn legacy crew. Firstly, “Tell the Wind and Fire” is not a funny book – not that you’d expect a retelling of a Dickens novel to be funny. The book does certainly have enough familiar elements to be called a “retelling” – the two cities, the Revolution, the murders and the heroine who is perceived as the beacon of light (The Golden Thread) thanks to her hair and status. I did like how the author added magic into the mix to make this an urban fantasy dystopian, but I wouldn’t call the plot devices used in the book “groundbreaking”. We have seen them in “The Hunger Games”, “Divergent”, “Half Bad” and several other YA dystopians. There’s nothing wrong with the societal divisions tropes, but to be frank, I have read far too many novels that use it to be suitably impressed.

Another issue I had with “Tell the Wind and Fire” is the pacing. It started off really well by diving into action that involved death threats right away, but what followed is a large chapter of nothing but background information on how Lucie and Ethan came to be and how the Light and Dark city can’t function without each other. What follows is events not unlike the ones that transpire in “A Tale of Two Cities”, except the pacing is kind of all over the place, making it quite difficult to understand why characters (bar the exception of Lucie, thanks to the info-dump) act the way they do. A great storyteller, which I know Sarah Rees Brennan to be, would weave a story that makes us understand the characters and the plot, as well as the setting without random chunks of information thrown at the reader. I am honestly a little surprised – Brennan’s other books weren’t anything like that.

However, I can’t imagine that retelling a novel as massive and dense as “A Tale of Two Cities” was an easy job to do, and I’m not saying that the author failed to complete the task. It’s certainly a far better retelling of a Dickens novel than “Olivia Twisted”, for instance. However, I do feel that it is next to impossible to squish a plot of “A Tale of Two Cities” into 350 pages or so and expect excellent results. My verdict is that “Tell the Wind and Fire” has an amazing premise that could’ve been executed spectacularly if it were a series or at least a much longer standalone, with fewer info-dumps and more room to flesh out the characters. My rating is 6/10.

 

Recommendations

You might like “Tell the Wind and Fire” if you liked:

“A Darker Shade of Magic” by V.E.Schwab

“A Court of Thorns and Roses” by Sarah J Maas

“A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens

Have you read “Tell the Wind and Fire” yet? Do you have any good retellings of Dickens’ novels that you’d like to recommend? Do let me know!

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2 thoughts on “Book Review: Tell the Wind and Fire by Sarah Rees Brennan

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