Book Review: These Shallow Graves by Jennifer Donnelly

graves

I apologise for being away for so long – work’s been very busy! I’ll try to catch up with my Friday Finds this week hopefully 🙂

 

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Jo Montfort is a teenage blue-blooded New Yorker whose fate is to marry an even more blue-blooded childhood friend of hers, Bram Aldrich and be a good socialite. However, Jo’s passions lie elsewhere. She wants to be a writer – like Nellie Bly – and she wants to write about girls and hardships they endure. However, society doesn’t look too kindly upon a strong-headed, imaginative girl in 19th century New York and Jo is about ready to kiss her dreams goodbye. Her life changes drastically, however, when her father is found dead in their home. The police believe that he killed himself, but Jo, who loved her father very much, wants to get the truth. She starts to dig into her father’s past and meets a charming reporter Eddie Gallagher, who has secrets of his own. As the mystery unveils, Jo is sucked deeper and deeper into the New York that she never even knew existed, riddled with prostitutes, madmen and murderers. Would her and Eddie be able to be together and achieve their writing dreams, or will Jo’s naivete make her the killer’s next target?

 

“These Shallow Graves” was the book I’ve been anticipating for a few months now – Jennifer Donnelly is one of my favourite authors. Long-time readers of this blog would remember that I fell in love with “Revolution” and “A Gathering Light”. I was thrilled to hear that she was writing another historical fiction novel with a strong female protagonist. I was therefore over the moon when I got this copy from Netgalley.

However, I must say that my expectations were too high. That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy the story – I most certainly did, and thought it to be one of the better murder mysteries I’ve read this year. Perhaps my love for Donnelly’s previous books has set the bar a little too high for “These Shallow Graves”, and, while I wouldn’t say I was disappointed, I was rather underwhelmed. “Revolution” and “A Gathering Light” kept me engaged from the very first page, but “These Shallow Graves” didn’t manage to suck me in until about 30% into the book.

The main character, Jo, seemed too much like a spoiled rich kid at the start, which is understandable, given her upbringing, but it didn’t compel me to like her until quite a bit into the book. She does go through quite a bit of development and become a lot more interesting as the book progresses, though. Her romance with Eddie was a little too insta-love – either I’ve forgotten what it’s like to be sixteen and in love, or girls back then fell in love way too quickly.

The supporting cast was, however, just as good as that of Donnelly’s other novels. Oscar, Fay, the Tailor and other characters were well-rounded and interesting to read about, and added several more layers to the mystery, making it all the more compelling. They are the strong sides of “These Shallow Graves”, and so is the plot of the mystery. The writing is, while as atmospheric as her other books, just didn’t work for me. This is because I expected a lot more in terms of writing, given how much effect Jennifer Donnelly’s previous works had on me. I’d still recommend the book, though, and can’t wait for her next one!

 

Favourite quotes:

“If you’re going to bury the past, bury it deep, girl. Shallow graves always give up their dead”.

“Morality is a luxury, my darling. A very expensive one”.

 

Recommendations

You might like “These Shallow Graves” if you liked:

“The Cure for Dreaming” by Cat Winters

“Velvet Undercover” by Teri Brown

“Vengeance Road” by Erin Bowman

 

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